Red Wine and Chocolate Ice Cream

Instead of eating chocolate and drinking red wine like the plebeian you are, why not transcend getting over a bad break-up by combining that with ice cream.

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First you prepare a chocolate ice cream base by heating it to creamy perfection.

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Then you combine that with a whole bottle of red wine, reduced down to a fifth of its original volume. This turns your ice cream a soft shade of pink, like my face after one sip of wine.

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You get ice cream that distinctly tastes of red wine (so the alcoholic in you’s satisfied). Then you get the darkness of the chocolate running through the background, making the whole thing just that much more decadent.

I adapted this recipe from ice cream science again, and just added chocolate.

Ingredients

  • 417g double cream (see notes)
  • 319g semi-skimmed milk
  • 46g skimmed milk powder
  • 120g sugar
  • 78g egg yolks (about 4 medium eggs)
  • 20g cocoa powder
  • 750ml bottle red wine (choose something you like. I used Rioja on the recommendation of a friend since I know nothing about wine)

Method

  1. Mix yolks, sugar, skimmed milk powder, and cocoa powder vigorously together in a large saucepan. This is to stop the yolks from curdling.
  2. Mix in the cream and milk.
  3. Heat the mixture over medium heat, stirring constantly. You’re aiming to hold the mixture at about 71°C for about 20 mins to reduce the mixture by 15% by weight. If you don’t have a thermometer, you can just try to hold the mixture at the point when it’s steaming slightly (not too much and DEFINITELY not at a boil) and reduce it till it coats the back of your spoon. If you overheat your mixture you will get an eggy hydrogen sulfide taste.
  4. Cool the mixture down as fast as you can, preferably by cooling it in a container in an ice bath. Once it’s cool put it in the fridge to age overnight. This is to reduce the bacteria growing so the ice cream keeps for longer.
  5. While you’re reducing your ice cream mixture you could also reduce your red wine. Pour your red wine into a saucepan over medium heat and reduce it to 150ml. You don’t have to stir while reducing the red wine. Refrigerate your red wine mixture as well.
  6. The next day, put the ice cream mixture into your ice cream machine. Then pour in the reduced red wine.
  7. When the ice cream reaches the texture desired, stop churning and immediately store your ice cream in the freezer set at the lowest temperature (see notes).
  8. To eat, allow to thaw for 10 mins first.

Notes

  • If you know the fat percentage of the cream you’re using, you can use other cream. Go toicecreamscience’s original blog post to calculate the adjusted recipe amounts (he has an excel sheet).
  • Holding the ice cream at 71°C makes the proteins in the milk undergo reversible unfolding which contributes to the creamy texture of the ice cream.
  • If your freezer can’t go as low as -18°C (like mine), I recommend eating the ice cream within a day or two. It can get icy if you can’t store it at low enough temperatures.
  • I couldn’t get the ice cream to be as thick as previous attempts, but once it froze it had about the same texture as the other ice creams for some reason.
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Matcha Green Tea Ice Cream

One of my favourite flavours of ice cream!

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I’m just obsessed with matcha-flavoured desserts. The slight bitterness of it together with its fresh flavour works really well in sweet stuff.

I’ve always liked my matcha ice cream to be a little on the bitter side. But some people don’t really like that, so I think the amount of sugar used in this recipe is a happy compromise.

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I’ve basically been exclusively using recipes from icecreamscience because the ice cream that I get is just unbelievably smooth and creamy.

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This is essentially the same recipe as my previous lemon curd ice cream, but with slightly less sugar and replacing the lemon curd with matcha powder.

Ingredients

  • 417g double cream (see notes)
  • 319g semi-skimmed milk
  • 46g skimmed milk powder
  • 120g sugar
  • 78g egg yolks (about 4 eggs)
  • 20g matcha powder

Method

  1. Mix yolks, sugar, skimmed milk powder, and matcha powder vigorously together in a large saucepan. This is to stop the yolks from curdling.
  2. Mix in the cream and milk.
  3. Heat the mixture over medium heat, stirring constantly. You’re aiming to hold the mixture at about 71°C for about 20 mins to reduce the mixture by 15% by weight. If you don’t have a thermometer, you can just try to hold the mixture at the point when it’s steaming slightly (not too much and DEFINITELY not at a boil) and reduce it till it coats the back of your spoon. If you overheat your mixture you will get an eggy hydrogen sulfide taste.
  4. Cool the mixture down as fast as you can, preferably by cooling it in a container in an ice bath. Once it’s cool put it in the fridge to age overnight. This is to reduce the bacteria growing so the ice cream keeps for longer.
  5. The next day, put the ice cream mixture into your ice cream machine.
  6. When the ice cream reaches the texture desired, stop churning and immediately store your ice cream in the freezer set at the lowest temperature (orrr you could just eat it straight away).
  7. To eat, allow to thaw for 10 mins first.

Notes

  • If you know the fat percentage of the cream you’re using, you can use other cream. Go to icecreamscience’s original blog post to calculate the adjusted recipe amounts (he has an excel sheet).
  • Holding the ice cream at 71°C makes the proteins in the milk undergo reversible unfolding which contributes to the creamy texture of the ice cream.
  • If your freezer can’t go as low as -18°C (like mine), I recommend eating the ice cream within a day or two. It can get icy if you can’t store it at low enough temperatures.

Lemon Curd Ice Cream

This is a really refreshing ice cream that I could just keep on eating.

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You’re going to need an ice cream machine for this recipe though.

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Eating the lemon curd ice cream with some rich tea biscuits really reminded me of the lemon cream biscuits I used to just inhale when I was younger.

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I got this ice cream recipe from icecreamscience, who had a new and improved recipe using skimmed milk powder which increases the milk solid content in the ice cream which does…something to make it creamier. He has the full explanation on his blog.

I used my own lemon curd recipe which I got from my friend’s mum though. It’s a really easy lemon curd recipe you could just make in the microwave.

This recipe might seem a lot more complicated than a lot of the ice cream recipes out there, but it’s really worth it. You get an unbelievably creamy ice cream that tastes even better than the ice cream you can buy.

Ingredients

Ice cream

  • 417g double cream (see notes)
  • 319g semi-skimmed milk
  • 46g skimmed milk powder
  • 140g sugar
  • 78g egg yolks (about 4 eggs)

Lemon curd

  • 6 egg yolks
  • 100g sugar
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice (about 4 lemons)
  • The zest from the lemons you used
  • 57g melted butter
  • 1 tbsp cornflour

Method

Ice cream

  1. Mix yolks, sugar, and skimmed milk powder vigorously together in a large saucepan. This is to stop the yolks from curdling.
  2. Mix in the cream and milk.
  3. Heat the mixture over medium heat, stirring constantly. You’re aiming to hold the mixture at about 71°C for about 20 mins to reduce the mixture by 15% by weight. If you don’t have a thermometer, you can just try to hold the mixture at the point when it’s steaming slightly (not too much and DEFINITELY not at a boil) and reduce it till it coats the back of your spoon. If you overheat your mixture you will get an eggy hydrogen sulfide taste.
  4. Cool the mixture down as fast as you can, preferably by cooling it in a container in an ice bath. Once it’s cool put it in the fridge to age overnight. This is to reduce the bacteria growing so the ice cream keeps for longer.

Lemon curd

  1. Mix the yolks with the sugar vigorously. Then add the rest of the ingredients and mix.
  2. Microwave on medium-high for 1.5 mins. Stir.
  3. Repeat on medium or medium-high at 1 mins interval, stirring every time after you heat until the curd is thick.
  4. Sieve the curd into a container and store in the fridge overnight.

Assembly

  1. Put the ice cream mixture into your ice cream machine before adding in the lemon curd.
  2. When the ice cream reaches the texture desired, stop churning and immediately store your ice cream in the freezer set at the lowest temperature.
  3. To eat, allow to thaw for 10 mins first.

Notes

  • If you know the fat percentage of the cream you’re using, you can use other cream. Go to icecreamscience’s original blog post to calculate the adjusted recipe amounts (he has an excel sheet).
  • Holding the ice cream at 71°C makes the proteins in the milk undergo reversible unfolding which contributes to the creamy texture of the ice cream.
  • This tastes reaaaally good with some rich tea biscuits I really recommend it.
  • If your freezer can’t go as low as -18°C (like mine), I recommend eating the ice cream within a day or two. It can get icy if you can’t store it at low enough temperatures.

Balsamic Raspberry Ice Cream

The colour of this ice cream is just so lovely.

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I was worried about this recipe as I was using frozen fruits (a student budget doesn’t allow for 700g of fresh raspberries). The frozen raspberries had a higher water content, which can reduce the creaminess of the ice cream.

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But everything turned out all right in the end. The ice cream was still smooth and rich, and did not have a sandy texture as I feared.

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Balsamic vinegar is just a great addition to berries. It adds a tartness, and kind of gives the ice cream a more jam-like taste. It’s not meant to be a main flavour, it’s just there to bring out the raspberries.

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Added to the already winning combination of berries and cream, the holy trinity of balsamic, raspberries, and cream just worked beautifully together.

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My only gripe was that I chose not to sieve out the seeds of the raspberries, so it was not a completely smooth ice cream. I like my ice cream completely silky with no interruptions, but to my friend who likes a bit of texture in her ice cream, she thought the raspberry seeds were fine.

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I was keen about my packaging this time round as well.

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I got the recipe from icecreamscience, the same place I got my recipe for the dark chocolate and blue cheese ice cream. I just substituted strawberries for raspberries because the local Tesco’s didn’t have any frozen strawberries.

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Ingredients

  • 303g double cream (about 50.5% fat)
  • 504g semi-skimmed milk
  • 148g sugar
  • 65g egg yolks
  • 700g raspberries (I used frozen)
  • 4 tsp balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt

Method

  1. Day 1 – Combine raspberries with 20g of sugar and leave overnight.
  2. Day 2 – Add raspberries and syrup to a large saucepan and heat over medium heat. Once the water starts evaporating, heat for 13 mins (I heated it for about 18 mins since the frozen raspberries had more water).
  3. Take the pan off the heat, and transfer contents to bowl and allow to cool. Once cooled, add 4 tsp of balsamic vinegar. Cover and leave to infuse overnight.
  4. Add sugar and egg yolks to a large saucepan and mix until pale. Add the cream, milk, and salt. Stir, and then place over medium heat and continue stirring for 60 mins. You want to aim for your mixture to reach 71.4°C for 60 mins. Do not overheat your mixture or the proteins in the mixture will aggregate and cause a eggy sulforous smell. Stir constantly.
  5. Take the pan off the heat and then pour the mixture into a container. The faster you can cool this mixture down to about 10°C, the less bacteria will grow and the longer your ice cream will last. If you are conscientious you can float your container in ice mixed with salt and a bit of water.
  6. Let cool, and then cover and leave the mixture overnight in the fridge. The crystallisation of fat in the ice cream during this period of time helps maintain the shape of the ice cream and helps it melt slower.
  7. Day 3 – Pour the cream mixture into the ice cream machine. Then pour the fruits into the machine. When it reaches your desired consistency, transfer to a pre-cooled container and place in freezer immediately to firm up. The faster it reaches -18°C in the freezer, the less ice crystals will form in your ice cream so a sandy texture wouldn’t develop. Chill overnight.
  8. When serving, let it thaw first for about 5-10 mins. If it’s too cold it doesn’t taste as creamy and sweet.

Notes

  • I feel that strawberries and balsamic is a nicer flavour combination, so try to use strawberries if available. Or you can try both out and see which one you like better.
  • If you don’t want seeds in your ice cream I suggest sieving your fruit pulp before adding to the cream, but I’m not sure if this would affect the volume of the ice cream or any other factors.
  • This recipe requires 2 days of prep time (or 1 if you start early).
  • The website this recipe came from has got recipe quantities for different cream fat percentages.
  • I didn’t have a thermometer so if you are like me and like to guesstimate through this recipe, just maintain a medium heat for an hour and stir constantly. If it’s bubbling, it’s probably overheating so take it off the heat. In the end your ice cream mixture should be able to coat the back of your spoon.
  • If you’re using an ice cream maker that needs to freeze the bowl in the freezer beforehand, make sure to cover it with clingfilm so ice crystals won’t form in the bowl and cause your ice cream to have a sandy texture.

Dark Chocolate and Blue Cheese Ice Cream

You read that right.

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Blue cheese and chocolate is a flavour combination that has been around for a while now, although many might not have heard of it.

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The flavour combination might sound a bit non-intuitive but there is actually some science behind it. I first heard about this pairing in a documentary about food when I was 10, and have been fantasizing about it ever since. And what do you know when I googled it, someone had already come out with a recipe for a blue cheese and chocolate ice cream.

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10 years later, my dream has finally come to fruition in this creamy lovechild. I had leftover chocolate from making chocolate bread. I had leftover blue cheese from making a walnut and blue cheese loaf. This was fate.

Apparently it goes well together because they share many similar flavour molecules. In particular, the ketones given off by bacteria in the lipolysis of blue cheese are similar to the ketones also found in cocoa. So the blue cheese serves to highlight the flavour of the chocolate and really makes it stand out.

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This recipe will require an ice cream maker (look at it churn!).

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Don’t worry, if I didn’t tell you there was blue cheese in it you probably wouldn’t be able to taste it. You’d just notice there was something different about the chocolate. Maybe it seems more intense then usual. Maybe there is a floral note that isn’t usually present. In the end you just get a really intense chocolate flavour brought to new levels of complexity by the blue cheese, chocolate, and vanilla bean paste.

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Flavour aside, the texture of this ice cream is amazing as well, and I have to give props to a Ruben of Ice Cream Science for his detailed instructions on how to achieve that smooth, velvety texture completely devoid of sandy ice crystals.

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Clearly taking this too seriously.

Ingredients (about 1 l of ice cream)

  • 333g double cream (about 50.5% fat)
  • 555g semi-skimmed milk
  • 141g sugar
  • 72g egg yolks (about 4 medium egg yolks)
  • 20g cocoa powder
  • 40g dark chocolate (at least 70%)
  • 25g blue cheese
  • 3g instant coffee/espresso powder
  • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste

Method

  1. Whisk your sugar and your eggs together until pale yellow in colour. This would make your eggs less likely to curdle later.
  2. Add the sugar and egg yolks mixture to a wide-diameter saucepan (the wider-diameter the better for concentrating the mixture for a smooth and creamy texture. Something to do with heating the proteins so they undergo reversible unfolding). Add cream, milk, and cocoa powder and mix. Break the dark chocolate into small pieces and then add to pan.
  3. Heat the mixture over medium heat and keep stirring gently. You want to aim for your mixture to reach 71.4°C for 60 mins. Do not overheat your mixture or the proteins in the mixture will aggregate and cause a eggy sulforous smell. Stir constantly.
  4. After 50 mins, add the coffee and the blue cheese. Stir well until the cheese is dissolved.
  5. Take the pan off the heat and then pour the mixture into a container. Stir in the vanilla extract. The faster you can cool this mixture down to about 10°C, the less bacteria will grow and the longer your ice cream will last. If you are conscientious you can float your container in ice mixed with salt and a bit of water.
  6. Age your mixture overnight in the fridge. The crystallisation of fat in the ice cream during this period of time helps maintain the shape of the ice cream and helps it melt slower.
  7. The next day, pour in your ice cream machine and make the ice cream. When it reaches your desired consistency, transfer to a pre-cooled container and place in freezer immediately to firm up. The faster it reaches -18°C in the freezer, the less ice crystals will form in your ice cream so a sandy texture wouldn’t develop. Chill overnight.
  8. When serving, let it thaw first for about 5-10 mins. If it’s too cold it doesn’t taste as creamy and sweet.

Notes

  • The website I took the recipe from said you’ll end up with 750ml but I ended up with something closer to 1l.
  • If you’re using an ice cream maker that needs to freeze the bowl in the freezer beforehand, make sure to cover it with clingfilm so ice crystals won’t form in the bowl and cause your ice cream to have a sandy texture.
  • I didn’t have a thermometer so if you are like me and like to guesstimate through this recipe, just maintain a medium heat for an hour and stir constantly. If it’s bubbling, it’s probably overheating so take it off the heat. In the end your ice cream mixture should be able to coat the back of your spoon, and running your finger through it should leave a clear line like in the picture in the post. I still ended up with an amazing texture so if you’re not aiming for perfection it’s good enough.
  • The website I got this from has recipe variations for 36% fat and 38% fat cream.
  • Yeah you can substitute the vanilla bean paste for vanilla extract. Vanilla essence, in a pinch, but you won’t get a good flavour. The sweetness of the vanilla really helps balance out the coffee.
  • You’re adding the coffee and vanilla so late in the process because their flavour compounds are quite volatile.