Onion Rye Sourdough

This recipe yields a super crunchy loaf with a super fluffy crumb.

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Rye just gives bread this soft chew to it, giving a great contrast to the super crunchy crust produced by the steam in the oven.

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And you can’t go wrong with onions in bread, and the tried and tested combination of rye with molasses.

This bread was very loosely adapted from here. Since I had one starter and they had two (TWO?! WHO USES TWO STARTERS!?), they didn’t provide a baking time and temperature, and I added the onion and herbs.

Ingredients

  • 250g starter (mine was 100%)
  • 22g molasses AKA black treacle
  • 152g water
  • 251g strong white flour
  • 80g rye flour
  • 22g oil
  • 9g salt
  • 1 raw white onion, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds
  • 1 tbsp dried rosemary

Method

  1. Mix the starter with the molasses and water. Then add the white flour and rye flour. Then add the oil and salt. Stir until everything’s well incorporated. Transfer to a large bowl and cover with cling film.
  2. Let it rest for 4 hours, folding it 3 times (so rest 1 hour then fold. Rest another hour and fold. Rest another hour and fold. Rest 1 hour) – See notes.
  3. Fold in the raw onion, caraway seeds, and dried rosemary.
  4. Place the dough in the fridge for a 10h cold retardation.
  5. Take the dough out of the fridge and transfer to your proofing basket. Let rise for 2.5 hours.
  6. Preheat your oven to 230°C and place a tray half-filled with water on the bottom shelf.
  7. Tip the bread out of the proofing basket and score the bread. Bake at 230°C for 30 mins, then lower the temperature to 200°C for 20 mins. When the bread is ready, it should sound hollow when you tap it.
  8. Let cool on wire rack.

Notes

  • 100% hydration just means my starter was equal parts by weight water and flour.
  • To see how I started my sourdough starter, see this post.
  • This bread uses the folding technique rather than the kneading technique. To see how to fold, see this video.
  • This had a better crust than my previous rye sourdough. I think that has got to do with the temperature used, specifically baking the bread at the higher temperature for longer.
  • Be very sparing with the caraway seeds they have quite a strong flavour which can be an acquired taste.
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3 thoughts on “Onion Rye Sourdough

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